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Open Access Research

‘It’s a can of worms’: understanding primary care practitioners’ behaviours in relation to HPV using the theoretical domains framework

Lisa A McSherry1, Stephan U Dombrowski2, Jill J Francis3, Judith Murphy1, Cara M Martin4, John J O’Leary4, Linda Sharp1* and ATHENS Group

Author Affiliations

1 National Cancer Registry, Building 6800 Cork Airport Business Park, Kinsale Road, Cork, Ireland

2 Institute of Health and Society, Medical Faculty, Newcastle University, Baddiley-Clarke Building, Richardson Road, Newcastle, NE2 4AX, UK

3 Aberdeen Health Psychology Group, University of Aberdeen, Health Sciences Building Foresterhill, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD, Scotland

4 Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dolphin’s Barn, Dublin 8, Ireland

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Implementation Science 2012, 7:73  doi:10.1186/1748-5908-7-73

Published: 3 August 2012

Abstract

Background

The relationship between infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer is transforming cervical cancer prevention. HPV tests and vaccinations have recently become available. In Ireland, as elsewhere, primary care practitioners play a key role in prevention. ATHENS (A Trial of HPV Education and Support) aims to develop a theory-based intervention to support primary care practitioners in their HPV-related practice. This study, the first step in the intervention development process, aimed to: identify HPV-related clinical behaviours that the intervention will target; clarify general practitioners’ (GPs’) and practice nurses’ roles and responsibilities; and determine factors that potentially influence clinical behaviour. A secondary objective was to informally assess the utility of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) in understanding clinical behaviours in an area with an evolving evidence-base.

Methods

In-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with GPs and practice nurses. The topic guide, which contained open questions and HPV-related clinical scenarios, was developed through literature review and clinical experience. Interview transcripts were content-analysed using the TDF as the coding framework.

Results

19 GPs and 14 practice nurses were interviewed. The major HPV-related clinical behaviours were: initiating a discussion about HPV infection with female patients; offering/recommending HPV vaccination to appropriate patients; and answering patients’ questions about HPV testing. While the responsibility for taking smears was considered a female role, both male and female practitioners dealt with HPV-related issues. All 12 theoretical domains arose in relation to HPV infection; the domains judged to be most important were: knowledge, emotion, social influences, beliefs about capabilities and beliefs about consequences. Eleven domains emerged in relation to HPV vaccination, with beliefs about consequences, social influences, knowledge and environmental context and resources judged to be the most important. Nine domains were relevant to HPV testing, with knowledge and beliefs about capabilities judged to be the most important.

Conclusions

The findings confirm the need for an intervention to support primary care practitioners around HPV and suggest it should target a range of theoretical domains. The TDF proved valuable in analysing qualitative data collected using a topic guide not specifically designed to capture TDF domains and understanding clinical behaviours in an area with an evolving evidence-base.

Keywords:
Cervical screening; HPV; Clinical behaviours; GPs; Practice nurses; Primary care; TDF; Knowledge; Emotion; Social influences; Beliefs about capabilities; Beliefs about consequences