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Open Access Short report

Pilot study evaluating the effects of an intervention to enhance culturally appropriate hypertension education among healthcare providers in a primary care setting

Erik JAJ Beune1*, Patrick JE Bindels2, Jacob Mohrs1, Karien Stronks3 and Joke A Haafkens1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of General Practice/Clinical Methods and Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

2 Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Burg. s' Jacobplein 51, 3015 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands

3 Department of Social Medicine/Clinical Methods and Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

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Implementation Science 2010, 5:35  doi:10.1186/1748-5908-5-35

Published: 14 May 2010

Abstract

Background

To improve hypertension care for ethnic minority patients of African descent in the Netherlands, we developed a provider intervention to facilitate the delivery of culturally appropriate hypertension education. This pilot study evaluates how the intervention affected the attitudes and perceived competence of hypertension care providers with regard to culturally appropriate care.

Methods

Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires were used to measure the attitudes, experienced barriers, and self-reported behaviour of healthcare providers with regard to culturally appropriate cardiovascular and general care at three intervention sites (N = 47) and three control sites (N = 35).

Results

Forty-nine participants (60%) completed questionnaires at baseline (T0) and nine months later (T1). At T1, healthcare providers who received the intervention found it more important to consider the patient's culture when delivering care than healthcare providers who did not receive the intervention (p = 0.030). The intervention did not influence experienced barriers and self-reported behaviour with regard to culturally appropriate care delivery.

Conclusion

There is preliminary evidence that the intervention can increase the acceptance of a culturally appropriate approach to hypertension care among hypertension educators in routine primary care.